Main Stage

Friday, May 4, 2018 to Saturday, May 5, 2018

8:00 PM

directed by Jake Nice

It's time to get real and sing along about the one thing we all have in common: we're gonna die. This existential cabaret boldly explores the rough moments of life with humor, insight, and pop music. Jake Nice's production featuring Sammy Rat Rios sold out venues across DFW in 2017 and we'll be bringing the excitement back to Fort Worth. 

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Friday, May 11, 2018 to Sunday, May 27, 2018

Thursdays–Saturdays, 8:00 PM | Sundays, 2:00 PM

directed by Eric Tucker

After six years in the United States Army and suffering post traumatic stress, Stephan Wolfert hopped off an Amtrak train deep in the mountain of Montana. He was far from home, close to the middle of nowhere, and without the first clue of what to do for the rest of his life. Until, as fate would have it, he stepped into a local theater and saw a production of William Shakespeare's Richard III

Twenty years later, using Shakespeare's timeless words, and a few of his own, Stephan leads us on an interactive journey to meet Shakespeare's soldiers in Cry Havoc! 

 

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Friday, July 13, 2018 to Sunday, August 5, 2018

Thursdays–Saturdays, 8:00 PM | Sundays, 2:00 PM

Sports agent Liz Rico is at the top of her game, but a woman in a man’s industry has to fight to stay there. She takes on client Freddie Luna, a high school basketball superstar with a troubled past in the ultimate bet: will this be the biggest win of her career or will she lose it all? Award-winning playwright Fernanda Coppel's story of gender, race, and class is high energy and full of heart. 

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Friday, October 5, 2018 to Sunday, October 28, 2018

Thursdays–Saturdays, 8:00 PM | Sundays, 2:00 PM

An artist is murdered, leaving his two friends suspecting each other. There is one thing that unites them all: their infatuation with Sophie. Before she tragically went blind, she fell in love with one of them after viewing his picture in a gallery, but there seems to be confusion about whose picture she saw. As in any Stoppard play, reality is never quite what it seems.

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